PARTISAN+TOP-TWO
A Hybrid Primary = Path to Free and Fair Elections
WHERE WE HAVE BEEN

The Nonpartisan Top-Two Primary

In a “Nonpartisan” Top-Two election, all voters and candidates participate equally in the primary - regardless of party affiliation or non-affiliation, and only the top two candidates advance to the general election. All voters participate equally in the general election, and the candidate with the most votes is elected. A Nonpartisan Top-Two is a free election process. So why do we still conduct closed partisan elections nearly everywhere except Washington State, California and Louisiana? Closed partisan primaries still exist in Oregon because voters have rejected the Nonpartisan Top-Two primary twice in recent years - by huge margins. This occurred even though polls consistently show a strong majority of Oregon voters support election reform.
In 2012, voters in Arizona defeated Proposition 121 – an initiative very similar to the measures that were defeated in Oregon. A completely different state, with a completely different electorate, but the margin of defeat was nearly identical.
Measure 65 (2008) Changes General Election Nomination Processes for Major/Minor Party, Independent Candidates for Most Partisan Offices Yes    553,640 No 1,070,580 (Source: Oregon Blue Book)
Measure 90 (2014) Changes general election nomination processes: Provides for single primary election ballot listing candidates; top two advance. Yes 459,629 No 987,050 (Source: Oregon Blue Book)
Proposition 121 (2012) Creating an Open Primary giving all qualified voters the right to vote for the candidates of their choice… Yes    662,336 No 1,340,286 (Source: State of Arizona Official Canvas, 2012 General Election - Nov 6,2012)
If an initiative fails by a 2:1 margin, something about the initiative is very, very wrong. Simply placing it back on the ballot with a different sponsor and marketing campaign won’t change anything. For whatever reason, many voters lie to pollsters about their support for election reform - or - opponents of election reform found and exploited one or more fatal flaws in these initiatives.
PARTISAN+TOP-TWO
A Hybrid Primary = Path to Free and Fair Elections
WHERE WE HAVE BEEN

The Nonpartisan Top-Two Primary

In a “Nonpartisan” Top-Two election, all voters and candidates participate equally in the primary - regardless of party affiliation or non-affiliation, and only the top two candidates advance to the general election. All voters participate equally in the general election, and the candidate with the most votes is elected. A Nonpartisan Top-Two is a free election process. So why do we still conduct closed partisan elections nearly everywhere except Washington State, California and Louisiana? Closed partisan primaries still exist in Oregon because voters have rejected the Nonpartisan Top-Two primary twice in recent years - by huge margins. This occurred even though polls consistently show a strong majority of Oregon voters support election reform.
In 2012, voters in Arizona defeated Proposition 121 – an initiative very similar to the measures that were defeated in Oregon. A completely different state, with a completely different electorate, but the margin of defeat was nearly identical.
Measure 65 (2008) Changes General Election Nomination Processes for Major/Minor Party, Independent Candidates for Most Partisan Offices Yes    553,640 No 1,070,580 (Source: Oregon Blue Book)
Measure 90 (2014) Changes general election nomination processes: Provides for single primary election ballot listing candidates; top two advance. Yes 459,629 No 987,050 (Source: Oregon Blue Book)
Proposition 121 (2012) Creating an Open Primary giving all qualified voters the right to vote for the candidates of their choice… Yes    662,336 No 1,340,286 (Source: State of Arizona Official Canvas, 2012 General Election - Nov 6,2012)
If an initiative fails by a 2:1 margin, something about the initiative is very, very wrong. Simply placing it back on the ballot with a different sponsor and marketing campaign won’t change anything. For whatever reason, many voters lie to pollsters about their support for election reform - or - opponents of election reform found and exploited one or more fatal flaws in these initiatives.