Copyright © 2019, Paul Damian Wells, Corvallis, Oregon    Contact
Only 10 months to go! The first caucus of the U.S. Presidential primary is set for February 3, 2020 in Iowa. By this time next year, the campaigns will be in full swing. Will you be allowed to participate in selecting the top two candidates for the 2020 general election ballot - or- Will you receive a blank primary ballot like 2016?
976,260Voters1 706,393Voters1 1,081,321Voters1 1Official Oregon Voter Registration as of 1/2019 Oregon 2016 Presidential Primary Ballots
In states with closed  primaries or caucuses, only voters affiliated 2  with a major party are allowed to participate. By law, all minor party and Independent voters are excluded. 2 Traditionally, voters declared their affiliation with a political party at the time of registration. More recently, many states have adopted “Relaxed Registration Requirements (R 3 )”. In these states, a voter may declare party affiliation by simply requesting or choosing a partisan ballot - often as late as the day of the election.
Which ballot would you like? Democrat? Republican? Independent ... or I don't give a damn?
Both major parties typically field more than one candidate for president. There were 13 Republican candidates running in the 2016 Florida presidential primary, and there will likely be several Democrats running in 2020. Both major parties need a closed primary to consolidate their support and resources behind a single candidate - but how does that justify excluding one out of every three voters who are not major party members?
The Hybrid Primary - A new type of election. A “Hybrid Primary” uses a two-stage vote tally to combine the existing closed major party contests with a single open top-four election. There are still three different ballots used - Republican, Democrat and “Open”. Unlike the existing ballots however, the name of every candidate appears on every ballot. All voters and candidates participate equally.
The partisan ballots are tallied first, with the top  candidate receiving all of his/her party votes cast. (Winner take all) The results of the partisan tally are then added to votes cast by open ballot. Only the top four candidates advance to the general election. Independent voters secure the right to participate in selecting the top candidates for the general election ballot. Minor party candidates secure the right of equal ballot access for both the primary and general election. Major political parties retain the ability to consolidate their support behind a single candidate for each office. There is no added cost to the taxpayers when converting from a closed primary to a hybrid primary.
Read the full web-article at www.thekeel.org. Better yet, google some of these search phrases to see what Democrats and Republicans have to say about the exclusion of Independent and minor party voters in the primary: “What is a closed primary?” “What is an open primary?” “What is a hybrid primary?” “What is a free election?” “What is a fair election?” “How many types of primary are there?” “Which states have closed primaries?” “What is a semi-closed primary?”
The Keel: A large group of centrist voters, disenfranchised by the two party system.
A “Hybrid Primary” uses a two-stage vote tally to combine a single “open” primary with the “closed” party primaries. All voters and candidates are allowed to participate regardless of party affiliation.  Major parties retain the ability to consolidate their support behind a single candidate in a closed primary.
Copyright © 2019, Paul Damian Wells, Corvallis, Oregon    Contact
Only 10 months to go! The first caucus of the U.S. Presidential primary is set for February 3, 2020 in Iowa. By this time next year, the campaigns will be in full swing. Will you be allowed to participate in selecting the top two candidates for the 2020 general election ballot - or- Will you receive a blank primary ballot like 2016?
In states with closed  primaries or caucuses, only voters affiliated 2  with a major party are allowed to participate. By law, all minor party and Independent voters are excluded. 2 Traditionally, voters declared their affiliation with a political party at the time of registration. More recently, many states have adopted “Relaxed Registration Requirements (R 3 )”. In these states, a voter may declare party affiliation by simply requesting or choosing a partisan ballot - often as late as the day of the election.
Which ballot would you like? Democrat? Republican? Independent ... or I don't give a damn?
Both major parties typically field more than one candidate for president. There were 13 Republican candidates running in the 2016 Florida presidential primary, and there will likely be several Democrats running in 2020. Both major parties need a closed primary to consolidate their support and resources behind a single candidate - but how does that justify excluding one out of every three voters who are not major party members?
The Hybrid Primary - A new type of election. A “Hybrid Primary” uses a two-stage vote tally to combine the existing closed major party contests with a single open top-four election. There are still three different ballots used - Republican, Democrat and “Open”. Unlike the existing ballots however, the name of every candidate appears on every ballot. All voters and candidates participate equally.
Hybrid Primary Ballots
The partisan ballots are tallied first, with the top  candidate receiving all of his/her party votes cast. (Winner take all) The results of the partisan tally are then added to votes cast by open ballot. Only the top four candidates advance to the general election. Independent voters secure the right to participate in selecting the top candidates for the general election ballot. Minor party candidates secure the right of equal ballot access for both the primary and general election. Major political parties retain the ability to consolidate their support behind a single candidate for each office. There is no added cost to the taxpayers when converting from a closed primary to a hybrid primary.
Read the full web-article at www.thekeel.org. Better yet, google some of these search phrases to see what Democrats and Republicans have to say about the exclusion of Independent and minor party voters in the primary: “What is a closed primary?” “What is an open primary?” “What is a hybrid primary?” “What is a free election?” “What is a fair election?” “How many types of primary are there?” “Which states have closed primaries?” “What is a semi-closed primary?”
976,260Voters1 706,393Voters1 1,081,321Voters1 1Official Oregon Voter Registration as of 1/2019 Oregon 2016 Presidential Primary Ballots
The Keel: A large group of centrist voters, disenfranchised by the two party system.
A “Hybrid Primary” uses a two-stage vote tally to combine a single “open” primary with the “closed” party primaries. All voters and candidates are allowed to participate regardless of party affiliation.  Major parties retain the ability to consolidate their support behind a single candidate in a closed primary.
The Hybrid Primary Election Reform in Oregon
The Hybrid Primary Election Reform in Oregon