PARTISAN+TOP-TWO
A Hybrid Primary = Path to Free and Fair Elections
GET INVOLVED

Contact your state lawmakers.

If you’d like to get involved and do something productive, you don’t need to donate any money or collect any signatures. You simply need to contact your elected representatives and make them aware that an alternative exists for establishing free elections - an election process that does not require abolishing the bipartisan system. Do: Identify yourself as a constituent. Give your full name and address. Be polite and respectful Don’t: Make threats or accusations Send automated emails from a list. Roughly 33% of Oregon voters supported the nonpartisan top-two initiatives that failed here in recent years. We need 50% support to be successful. By providing a process that is fair to major party candidates and abandoning the requirement that the bipartisan system be abolished - we should be able to pick up more support. Specifically, we need the support of Democrats.
If there are two or more progressive candidates on the general election ballot - and only one conservative - the conservative candidate can win by default with far less than 50% of the vote. The electoral college compounds the situation further because many states like Florida are winner- take-all.
Florida 2000 Election Results     Elect College Bush/Cheney(REP)    2,912,790     25 Delegates Gore/Lieberman(DEM)    2,912,253       0 Delegates Nader/LaDuke(GRE)         97,488       0 Delegates Buchanan/Foster(REF)         17,484       0 Delegates Brown/Olivier(LIB)         16,415       0 Delegates (Source: Florida Department of State, Div of Elections)

Consolidating the Progressive Vote

Closed partisan primaries allow both major parties the opportunity to consolidate their support behind a single candidate prior to the general election. For Democrats, this really isn’t enough. Democrats need all the “progressive” voters backing a single candidate prior to the general election. The results of the 2000 U.S. Presidential Election in Florida illustrates the problem quite well.
PARTISAN+TOP-TWO
A Hybrid Primary = Path to Free and Fair Elections
GET INVOLVED

Contact your state lawmakers.

If you’d like to get involved and do something productive, you don’t need to donate any money or collect any signatures. You simply need to contact your elected representatives and make them aware that an alternative exists for establishing free elections - an election process that does not require abolishing the bipartisan system. Do: Identify yourself as a constituent. Give your full name and address. Be polite and respectful Don’t: Make threats or accusations Send automated emails from a list. Roughly 33% of Oregon voters supported the nonpartisan top-two initiatives that failed here in recent years. We need 50% support to be successful. By providing a process that is fair to major party candidates and abandoning the requirement that the bipartisan system be abolished - we should be able to pick up more support. Specifically, we need the support of Democrats.
If there are two or more progressive candidates on the general election ballot - and only one conservative - the conservative candidate can win by default with far less than 50% of the vote. The electoral college compounds the situation further because many states like Florida are winner-take-all.
Florida 2000 Election Results     Elect College Bush/Cheney(REP)    2,912,790     25 Delegates Gore/Lieberman(DEM)    2,912,253       0 Delegates Nader/LaDuke(GRE)         97,488       0 Delegates Buchanan/Foster(REF)         17,484       0 Delegates Brown/Olivier(LIB)         16,415       0 Delegates (Source: Florida Department of State, Div of Elections)

Consolidating the Progressive Vote

Closed partisan primaries allow both major parties the opportunity to consolidate their support behind a single candidate prior to the general election. For Democrats, this really isn’t enough. Democrats need all the “progressive” voters backing a single candidate prior to the general election. The results of the 2000 U.S. Presidential Election in Florida illustrates the problem quite well.