A note from the author

Paul Damian Wells
Welcome, my name is Paul Damian Wells. I’m a voting rights activist from Corvallis, Oregon and I’ve been active in election reform since 1992. I’m 58 years old and I’ve been voting since I was 18. I’ve lived my entire life in the United States - but in 40 years of voting, I’ve never participated in a free election for President. I’ve also never voted in a free election for Governor, U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator, ... The list goes on and on. That’s my gripe. For decades, I’ve been a staunch advocate for nonpartisan elections, Nonetheless, I’ve finally accepted the fact that some compromise must be made that includes political parties. Independents make up about 1/3 of registered voters. We need 50% to pass any reform initiative. The shortfall must be made up by Democrats and Republicans. There’s no other way. In 2004 I was running as a Democratic candidate for Secretary of State, and was torched by the Willamette Week Newspaper editors in their election endorsement. This is my favorite quote from years of advocacy. (Note: I don’t hate the editors of Willamette Week. This was a very fair analysis of my candidacy and it’s my fault for not listening at the time. They were making a very important and valid point.)
I’m almost done My time as an advocate will be coming to an end in the next 10 years, and I’ve written this article to pass on some of what I’ve learned to the younger generation that will be taking over. I believe this is most productive thing I can do right now.
Copyright © 2019, Paul Damian Wells, Corvallis, Oregon    Contact
“He faces only token opposition in the Primary. His opponent, Paul Damian Wells, is a Newberg tech worker and perennial applicant for state office. Wells is a one-issue candidate who runs only as a way of highlighting his personal belief that party primaries should be abolished; he sought the same office in 2000 as a Republican. We expect we haven’t seen the last of him, though we can always hope.” WW Editorial Staff, May 4, 2004
Consolidating the Progressive Vote Closed partisan primaries allow both major parties the opportunity to consolidate their support behind a single candidate prior to the general election. For Democrats, this really isn’t enough. Democrats need all the “progressive” voters backing a single candidate prior to the last tally of the general election. The results of the 2000 U.S. Presidential Election in Florida illustrates the problem quite well.
Florida 200 Election Results
If there are two or more progressive candidates on the general election ballot - and only one conservative - the conservative candidate can win by default with far less than 50% of the vote. The electoral college compounds the situation further because many states like Florida are winner-take-all.
“Progressive” - not “Blue” The Democratic party was once called a “liberal” party. Somewhere in the 1990’s, Democrats decided to “re-brand” the party as “progressive”. Inasmuch as most Democrats now believe they are progressive and not liberal - the re-branding was successful. Unfortunately, not all progressives are liberal Democrats. Many Independents are progressive but not liberal - instead, very “pragmatic”. There are also many Republican progressives, but they are much too “fiscally conservative” to be liberals. These “other” progressives are in the minority, but Democrats cannot win a general election without them. Liberal Democrats just don’t have the votes. Oregon in particular, is not a “blue” state. It’s a very “progressive” state. Democrats only account for about 35% of registered voters. A large percentage, but not the 50% needed to win elections. Increasingly, the “other” progressives (pragmatic and fiscal conservatives) are refusing to support “liberal” progressive candidates. They don’t usually vote Republican, instead, they vote for third party candidates, write-in “NOTA” (None of the Above), or they simply don’t vote. Donald Trump isn’t president because a majority voted for him. Even Republicans refused to endorse him. Donald Trump is president because, a strong majority of voters (54%), refused to vote for  the liberal progressive candidate Hillary Clinton. It wasn’t the Russians, and it wasn’t because Hillary Clinton has a vagina and not a penis.

A note from the author

Paul Damian Wells
Welcome, my name is Paul Damian Wells. I’m a voting rights activist from Corvallis, Oregon and I’ve been active in election reform since 1992. I’m 58 years old and I’ve been voting since I was 18. I’ve lived my entire life in the United States - but in 40 years of voting, I’ve never participated in a free election for President. I’ve also never voted in a free election for Governor, U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator, ... The list goes on and on. That’s my gripe. For decades, I’ve been a staunch advocate for nonpartisan elections, Nonetheless, I’ve finally accepted the fact that some compromise must be made that includes political parties. Independents make up about 1/3 of registered voters. We need 50% to pass any reform initiative. The shortfall must be made up by Democrats and Republicans. There’s no other way. In 2004 I was running as a Democratic candidate for Secretary of State, and was torched by the Willamette Week Newspaper editors in their election endorsement. This is my favorite quote from years of advocacy. (Note: I don’t hate the editors of Willamette Week. This was a very fair analysis of my candidacy and it’s my fault for not listening at the time. They were making a very important and valid point.)
I’m almost done My time as an advocate will be coming to an end in the next 10 years, and I’ve written this article to pass on some of what I’ve learned to the younger generation that will be taking over. I believe this is most productive thing I can do right now.
Copyright © 2019, Paul Damian Wells, Corvallis, Oregon    Contact
“He faces only token opposition in the Primary. His opponent, Paul Damian Wells, is a Newberg tech worker and perennial applicant for state office. Wells is a one-issue candidate who runs only as a way of highlighting his personal belief that party primaries should be abolished; he sought the same office in 2000 as a Republican. We expect we haven’t seen the last of him, though we can always hope.” WW Editorial Staff, May 4, 2004
Consolidating the Progressive Vote Closed partisan primaries allow both major parties the opportunity to consolidate their support behind a single candidate prior to the general election. For Democrats, this really isn’t enough. Democrats need all the “progressive” voters backing a single candidate prior to the last tally of the general election. The results of the 2000 U.S. Presidential Election in Florida illustrates the problem quite well.
Florida 200 Election Results
If there are two or more progressive candidates on the general election ballot - and only one conservative - the conservative candidate can win by default with far less than 50% of the vote. The electoral college compounds the situation further because many states like Florida are winner-take- all.
“Progressive” - not “Blue” The Democratic party was once called a “liberal” party. Somewhere in the 1990’s, Democrats decided to “re-brand” the party as “progressive”. Inasmuch as most Democrats now believe they are progressive and not liberal - the re-branding was successful. Unfortunately, not all progressives are liberal Democrats. Many Independents are progressive but not liberal - instead, very “pragmatic”. There are also many Republican progressives, but they are much too “fiscally conservative” to be liberals. These “other” progressives are in the minority, but Democrats cannot win a general election without them. Liberal Democrats just don’t have the votes. Oregon in particular, is not a “blue” state. It’s a very “progressive” state. Democrats only account for about 35% of registered voters. A large percentage, but not the 50% needed to win elections. Increasingly, the “other” progressives (pragmatic and fiscal conservatives) are refusing to support “liberal” progressive candidates. They don’t usually vote Republican, instead, they vote for third party candidates, write-in “NOTA” (None of the Above), or they simply don’t vote. Donald Trump isn’t president because a majority voted for him. Even Republicans refused to endorse him. Donald Trump is president because, a strong majority of voters (54%), refused to vote for the liberal progressive candidate Hillary Clinton. It wasn’t the Russians, and it wasn’t because Hillary Clinton has a vagina and not a penis.
The Hybrid Primary Election Reform in Oregon
The Hybrid Primary Election Reform in Oregon