RESTARTING ELECTION REFORM
“Backing-Out” of a primary.  If Oregon (or any other state), adopts a Partisan+Top-Two election for President, there will be two national elections taking place simultaneously. As argued previously, the outcome of the overall presidential election will likely be determined by which names are on the ballot in which states. This in turn is determined by which states are conducting free and fair primary elections. The 2016 Democratic Presidential Primary in Oregon illustrates the situation very well: As shown, Bernie Sanders defeated Hillary Clinton by a staggering margin in a closed Democratic primary. If this had been conducted as a Partisan+Top-Two, the one third of Oregon voters registered as "unaffiliated" may also have voted and the margin of victory could have been even larger. Nonetheless, Oregon is a small state with relatively few delegates to the Democratic National Convention, and Hillary Clinton went on to to win the nomination of the National Democratic Party. As such, her name would have been preprinted on the general election ballot in every state except Oregon - where the name Bernie Sanders would have appeared alongside the name Donald Trump - the top two candidates selected by Oregon voters. The solution lies in the fact that a Partisan+Top-Two incorporates both a closed bipartisan primary and a Nonpartisan Top-Two. The Oregon primary is held in May of each presidential election year. The results of the partisan tally could be used to assign delegates to the national party conventions. By the end of July, both major parties will have held their conventions and selected their nominees. By this time, the Oregon Electoral College Committee should also be finished with the national vote canvass and certified the top two candidates for the general election ballot. An election referendum is then held on the first Tuesday in August to provide Oregon voters the opportunity to accept the canvass and certification of the Electoral College Committee or "back-out" to avoid a corrupted national presidential election. (If the name of the Democratic Presidential nominee does not appear on the ballot in all blue states - it is likely that Democrats will forfeit the office of President to the Republicans.) In the case where the voters choose to "back-out" of the Partisan+Top-Two primary, the names of the major party nominees are placed on the general election ballot along with the names of any minor party and Independent candidates. The election proceeds as normal and the Electoral College Delegates cast their votes for the winner of the Oregon general election without canvassing the national vote. Note that only Oregon voters (collectively) have the right to modify, nullify or otherwise ignore the results of the Oregon Primary.
PRIMARY REFERENDUMS
CORVALLIS, OREGON 17 MARCH 2018
RESTARTING ELECTION REFORM
“Backing-Out” of a primary.  If Oregon (or any other state), adopts a Partisan+Top-Two election for President, there will be two national elections taking place simultaneously. As argued previously, the outcome of the overall presidential election will likely be determined by which names are on the ballot in which states. This in turn is determined by which states are conducting free and fair primary elections. The 2016 Democratic Presidential Primary in Oregon illustrates the situation very well: As shown, Bernie Sanders defeated Hillary Clinton by a staggering margin in a closed Democratic primary. If this had been conducted as a Partisan+Top-Two, the one third of Oregon voters registered as "unaffiliated" may also have voted and the margin of victory could have been even larger. Nonetheless, Oregon is a small state with relatively few delegates to the Democratic National Convention, and Hillary Clinton went on to to win the nomination of the National Democratic Party. As such, her name would have been preprinted on the general election ballot in every state except Oregon - where the name Bernie Sanders would have appeared alongside the name Donald Trump - the top two candidates selected by Oregon voters. The solution lies in the fact that a Partisan+Top-Two incorporates both a closed bipartisan primary and a Nonpartisan Top-Two. The Oregon primary is held in May of each presidential election year. The results of the partisan tally could be used to assign delegates to the national party conventions. By the end of July, both major parties will have held their conventions and selected their nominees. By this time, the Oregon Electoral College Committee should also be finished with the national vote canvass and certified the top two candidates for the general election ballot. An election referendum is then held on the first Tuesday in August to provide Oregon voters the opportunity to accept the canvass and certification of the Electoral College Committee or "back-out" to avoid a corrupted national presidential election. (If the name of the Democratic Presidential nominee does not appear on the ballot in all blue states - it is likely that Democrats will forfeit the office of President to the Republicans.) In the case where the voters choose to "back-out" of the Partisan+Top-Two primary, the names of the major party nominees are placed on the general election ballot along with the names of any minor party and Independent candidates. The election proceeds as normal and the Electoral College Delegates cast their votes for the winner of the Oregon general election without canvassing the national vote. Note that only Oregon voters (collectively) have the right to modify, nullify or otherwise ignore the results of the Oregon Primary.
CORVALLIS, OREGON 17 MARCH 2018
PRIMARY REFERENDUMS
RESTARTING ELECTION REFORM
“Backing-Out” of a primary.  If Oregon (or any other state), adopts a Partisan+Top- Two election for President, there will be two national elections taking place simultaneously. As argued previously, the outcome of the overall presidential election will likely be determined by which names are on the ballot in which states. This in turn is determined by which states are conducting free and fair primary elections. The 2016 Democratic Presidential Primary in Oregon illustrates the situation very well: As shown, Bernie Sanders defeated Hillary Clinton by a staggering margin in a closed Democratic primary. If this had been conducted as a Partisan+Top-Two, the one third of Oregon voters registered as "unaffiliated" may also have voted and the margin of victory could have been even larger. Nonetheless, Oregon is a small state with relatively few delegates to the Democratic National Convention, and Hillary Clinton went on to to win the nomination of the National Democratic Party. As such, her name would have been preprinted on the general election ballot in every state except Oregon - where the name Bernie Sanders would have appeared alongside the name Donald Trump - the top two candidates selected by Oregon voters. The solution lies in the fact that a Partisan+Top-Two incorporates both a closed bipartisan primary and a Nonpartisan Top-Two. The Oregon primary is held in May of each presidential election year. The results of the partisan tally could be used to assign delegates to the national party conventions. By the end of July, both major parties will have held their conventions and selected their nominees. By this time, the Oregon Electoral College Committee should also be finished with the national vote canvass and certified the top two candidates for the general election ballot. An election referendum is then held on the first Tuesday in August to provide Oregon voters the opportunity to accept the canvass and certification of the Electoral College Committee or "back-out" to avoid a corrupted national presidential election. (If the name of the Democratic Presidential nominee does not appear on the ballot in all blue states - it is likely that Democrats will forfeit the office of President to the Republicans.) In the case where the voters choose to "back-out" of the Partisan+Top-Two primary, the names of the major party nominees are placed on the general election ballot along with the names of any minor party and Independent candidates. The election proceeds as normal and the Electoral College Delegates cast their votes for the winner of the Oregon general election without canvassing the national vote. Note that only Oregon voters (collectively) have the right to modify, nullify or otherwise ignore the results of the Oregon Primary.
PRIMARY REFERENDUMS
CORVALLIS, OREGON 17 MARCH 2018